Seattle Fire Station 28

Seattle, WA

Phased construction schedule allows busy fire station to remain in operation while new facility is constructed on same site.

Market

Civic

Services

Civil Engineering

Structural Engineering

Features

14,000-sf building

LEED Gold

Rainwater cistern

Collaboration with fire district

Brick exterior cladding

Phased construction schedule allows busy fire station to remain in operation while new facility is constructed on same site.

Fire Station 28 is one of the busiest stations in Seattle and had outgrown its existing space, originally constructed in 1951. Originally conceived as a renovation project, the design team created a phased schedule to replace the existing station on the same 1-acre site while allowing the department to remain fully operational during construction. The use of brick for the exterior cladding creates a link between the station and the traditional firehouses of the past.

The 14,000-sf station includes a single-story wing for the apparatus bays and support functions, and a two-story living area, kitchen and dayroom. The project also includes a new “pull-through” driveway, a new fueling facility, new parking areas, walks, retaining walls, and lawn/landscape areas.

Unique to the civil design is the reuse of rainwater falling on impervious surfaces for vehicle and fire apparatus washing. The basement of the old station serves as a rainwater cistern in order to avoid the construction of expensive underground storage tanks. All other portions of the old station were demolished.

Road improvements include rebuilding South Kenny Street with new asphalt, curb and gutter, drainage, planting strip, and sidewalk. The standard street section was altered to avoid impacts to an existing mature tree. Rainier Avenue South improvements included new sidewalks, planter strip, and curb.